Get In The Know About Childhood Illnesses

Just because a person becomes a parent, does not mean that they automatically have a “how to” manual downloaded into their brain.  There is NO “how to” manual for raising children that could possibly encompass everything parents face.  

There is, however, plenty of time to research and learn about what to expect as your child grows older.  Feeling prepared to handle a sick child is better than doing nothing.  Take a moment to absorb a bit of information, and read through this short overview, highlighting some of the most common childhood illnesses.  

The Common Cold

Children typically contract up to five colds per year.  When your child experiences a sore throat, coughing, headache, loss of appetite, a mild fever, and/or a runny nose, they are most likely experiencing a simple cold. 

The Common Cold is a viral infection, so there is really nothing a doctor’s visit will do to allay the sickness.  Treating the Common Cold is much less invasive than an orthodontist appointment.  The best thing to do for a child suffering from a cold is to pump them full of plenty of fluids and vitamin C, which have been proven to shorten a cold.  

Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)

Better known as Pink Eye, Conjunctivitis can be very bothersome and very contagious.  Pink Eye is a definite reason to keep a child from going to school.  One of the main reasons this illness is so common among children is because it is so contagious.  

Being that Conjunctivitis comes from the same sort of bacteria and viruses that cause the Common Cold, shortening the sickness can be encouraged by foods rich in vitamin A and B2.  Plenty of rest may also help treat the symptoms of Pink Eye.  

Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease is much less scary than it sounds.  Caused by enteroviruses, the symptoms will show up as a low-grade fever, sores or blisters in the mouth, palms, fingers, feet, and/or buttocks area.  

It is highly contagious, and typically spread from contact with infected mucus membranes.  Doctors typically treat the illness with pain medications and a healthy diet, rich in leafy greens.  

Respiratory Syncytial Virus

Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is more likely to strike in children under the age of two.  RSV is an illness that affects the lungs of small children.  Most cases are relatively benign and mirror the symptoms of a cold.  

Children suspected of having RSV should see the doctor as soon as possible, and refrain from contact with other children.  It is also important to note that while RSV may be no big deal for a healthy child, those with compromised immune systems can get very sick.